Answer Tough Interview Questions

How To Answer Tough Interview Questions Effectively

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Rehearsing your answers to the interview questions that most often stump your job search competition is one of the best ways to prepare for your next interview.

After all, if you’ve made it to the interview, theoretically, you should already meet the qualifications required to get the job done. Now, it’s all about going above and beyond, and shining among the pack of candidates vying for the spot.

How To Answer Tough Interview Questions

In order to help you prepare for the toughest interview questions, CareerBliss spoke with many hiring managers and asked them to reveal their favorite, toughest questions that trips up many of their candidates.

Make sure your read the full article for all six interview questions!

“What Are You Most Proud Of In Your Career?”

Cue: bragging rights! Don’t shy away or hesitate about your most proud achievements when you’re asked about your biggest accomplishments.

Hesitation can dampen your style and perceived confidence. Executive recruiter Kimberly Bishop says this question often results in a deer-in-headlights stare from interviewees.

“I don’t know. That’s a good question,” is a common – and bad – response.

Prepare ahead of time with concise, interesting stories of your greatest hits. Of course, there’s a fine line between enthusiasm about your achievements and straight up cockiness. To prevent crossing the line into arrogance, make sure you give credit where credit is due – this can also be a chance to demonstrate that you work well in a group and can take the lead to steer a project to success. Talk about how you achieved that success and how you plan to replicate it.

 

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CareerBliss

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5 comments

  1. Here’s on I heard for that old cliché “what’s your biggest weakness?”, reply with “honesty” when the interviewer says “I don’t consider that a weakness”, “I don’t give a **** about what you think” is the reply.

    Also, another answer is “Kryptonite”, if they don’t laugh you probably didn’t want to work there anyway.

  2. Start a Social Media Campaign of a Mobile brand on twitter. Look who is tainklg about that Mobile brand by searching, and start following them. Anyone saying negative thing about the brand, reply them with a humble answer. Customer care services used on twitter can be very influential for your brand awareness. This wont help in direst sales but will help in word of mouth. After this measure the performance of your site.

  3. How would you answer this question during a job interview? “Where are you originally from?”

    I know it is illegal to ask but I have been asked directly or indirectly in every single job interviews that I have had so far. Once they hear the answer, I can tell from their facial expression that it was not what they had expected. As much as I want to be optimistic but …

  4. I thought #5 on the list – “Which past manager has liked you the least, and what would this person tell me about you?” – is a great question, but it does put the interviewee in a tough spot. Talking negatively about a previous boss can paint a negative picture of you. With other tricky questions like this, don’t forget to practice, practice, practice. You’ll see that this question does not ask you elaborate on the manager, but on yourself, so this is not an opportunity to describe a bad boss.

    P.S. Career Bliss – I wish you allowed commenting on your articles on your website! You are missing out a great way to engage with your audience.

    http://www.CeciliaHarry.com

    • I do not think that really puts you in a bad light because they ask if ever in the past, you may not have been the best employee and since moat people slip up at work it allows you to say what may have went wrong and whether you learned from the lesson taught. I say it is like saying what is a shortcoming of yours but putting yourself in your previous bosses eyes. I think the article is very insightful and can get one prepared for tough questions which may come up.

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