CAREEREALISM http://www.careerealism.com Career Advice & Job Search Magazine Thu, 30 Jul 2015 20:03:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.3 Answering, ‘Do You Have A Minute?’ When You Really Don’t http://www.careerealism.com/answering-have-minute/ http://www.careerealism.com/answering-have-minute/#respond Thu, 30 Jul 2015 05:50:22 +0000 http://www.careerealism.com/?p=43576 You’re working hard on a project with a deadline, when a co-worker asks, “Do you have a minute?” Here's how to answer when you don't have the time to spare.

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You’re sitting at your desk, working hard on a project that has a strict timeline, when a co-worker walks up to you and asks, “Do you have a minute?”

Related: Overcoming Time Management Obstacles

Before you answer them, consider these suggestions from Edward Brown, author of The Time Bandit Solution, a book focused on workplace productivity and performance.

Here are Brown’s three strategies on answering, “Do you have a minute?”

1.  Be confident of your right to decline.

While you want to be able to help your co-worker, you simply don’t have the time to dedicate to them.

Your time at work is valuable! According to Brown, when an interruption throws you off task, you lose momentum due to the work stoppage and the time it takes to reorganize your thoughts and resources.

“You have to say to yourself, ‘I really don’t have a minute right now,’” said Brown. “If you don’t protect your time, you can’t expect other busy people to protect it for you.”

2. Get over the guilt of saying no.

When someone asks for your time, you might agree to help them (when you really don’t have the time to) because you don’t want to lose that person’s respect.

“If the interrupter is your boss, you’re afraid he or she will think you’re not responsive to any needs but your own or you can’t handle your workload,” said Brown. “If it’s a customer, you’re afraid they’ll take their business elsewhere, or if it’s a colleague, you’re afraid you won’t sound like a team player.”

Brown provided a great example of why you need to get over the guilt of saying no.

“If you have a budget with X dollars a month to spend on eating out, then there’s no agonizing over should you or shouldn’t you,” said Brown. “The dollars tell you yes or no; no argument, no drama.”

You can relate this back to the office by saying, if you have X number of hours each day to get X things accomplished, you’ll know exactly how much time you can dedicate to your tasks. If you don’t have the time to help someone, you simply don’t have the time, and that’s not something you should feel guilty about.

3. The opposite of ‘yes’ doesn’t have to be ‘no.’

If you know that you can’t help someone out because of time constraints, don’t just say ‘no’ and let the person walk away. Instead, Brown suggests you say something like this:

“I would like to give you my full attention. May I let you know when I can do that?”

Be sure to custom tailor this type of response depending on the situation and the person asking you. The answer you give your boss shouldn’t be the same as the answer you give your client.

“Even though you can’t give your time on the spot, you do have a valuable gift to offer: your full concentration and interest at a time of mutual convenience,” said Brown.

Hopefully, with these three simple strategies you’ll be able to answer your co-workers confidently, and with ease the next time they ask for your time.

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About the author

Sarah Lynch is an intern for CAREEREALISM Media. She is a senior Mass Communications Major with a minor in Public Relations at Lander University in Greenwood, South Carolina. Connect with her on LinkedIn or follow her on Twitter.

 


 

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Does Your Resume Get Along With Your Personal Brand? http://www.careerealism.com/resume-personal-brand-get-along/ http://www.careerealism.com/resume-personal-brand-get-along/#comments Thu, 30 Jul 2015 05:40:31 +0000 http://www.careerealism.com/?p=37543 Personal branding? Does this “personal brand thingy” apply to your situation? Find out if your resume gets along with your personal brand.

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Time and again, I encounter job seekers that have good prior or current work experience, pretty sharp resumes, and a convincing cover letters, but still struggle to get interviews.

Related: Is Your Personal Brand Wrong?

In situations like this, I like to suggest having a closer look at their personal brand. Personal brand? What do I mean by this exactly, and might this “personal brand thingy” also apply to your situation?

Personal branding is a complex subject, and in my opinion there is no one good definition that sums it up entirely. In my opinion, the bottom line and smallest denominator one can understand under the term personal branding is one’s reputation and legitimacy. And that is exactly the part that does not add up for some job seekers.

Random Resume Example

Take, for instance, a classic resume statement that recruiters frequently see in applications:

“Public speaker, author and presenter.”

This can indeed be a powerful statement: the candidate appears as subject matter expert and great and knowledgeable communicator.

Now, imagine the impressed recruiter or staffing specialist. He or she types your name into Google, Bing, and Yahoo (yes, they actually do this if they are interested in you!). However, the search results don’t show any speaking engagements or publications.

Online Message Vs. Resume Statements

The obvious problem: your online message and reputation does not highlight or support the value suggested in the resume statement. Now, this does by no means mean that this candidate’s resume statement is wrong or will be perceived as wrong by hiring authorities. After all, we can find a lot online, but not everything we have ever done shows up necessarily on the first two Google pages, right?

But, and here comes the real big “but:”

Put yourself in the position of the hiring authority for a second. What is your reaction?

Exactly, you are somewhat disappointed that you don’t see websites, articles or tweets confirming the skills that caught your interest. Again, not all too devastating by itself. You can still get that interview.

Unless, and here comes the big “unless:”

Another candidate out of the 250 applicants for this position has done their “homework” and actively managed their personal brand and online reputation. The do not only appear as expert on their resume, but also in social media etc.

Personal Branding is not a must, but…

Do you see where I am going with this? I am by no means saying that personal branding is a must for everybody to secure their next job or move up to next level of their career. But, and here is the big “but” once again:

Personal branding is another career development tool that is out there, and there are candidates who use it quite well.

Now, do you really want them to have that advantage over you, just because they are doing a little bit more homework?

If you feel like it is time to explore the topic of personal branding a little bit more in detail, feel free to drop me a line via my website www.windhof-communications.com . I offer free initial personal brand input. Just send me your current resume and, if you want, the link to your LinkedIn profile.

This post was originally published at an earlier date.

Related Posts

5 Personal Branding Resume Techniques You Must Try
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Tim Windhof

About the author

Tim Windhof is a published and enthusiastic Resume Writer and Career Coach who is fascinated by helping people take their careers to the next level. Tim is a resume expert and educator for the American Writers and Artists, Inc. and their Resume Writer Training program. Tim has written interview-yielding resumes for clients from the US, Canada, India, Australia, Germany, Austria, and the Netherlands.


Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here.

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4 Ways To Pass The 8-Second Resume Glance http://www.careerealism.com/resume-glance-pass/ http://www.careerealism.com/resume-glance-pass/#respond Thu, 30 Jul 2015 05:30:50 +0000 http://www.careerealism.com/?p=41804 Recruiters scan resumes - it's just a fact. If you want a positive response on your resume in the 8-second resume glance, here’s what you have to do...

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Skimming – that’s what hiring managers are doing when they are going through resumes. There’s no time to read word-for-word when there are hundreds of resumes coming in for that one position, so they skim for key information. In fact, studies show that they spend about eight seconds scanning your resume.

Related: 3 Ways To Get Your Resume Past The ATS

If you want a positive response on your resume in the 8-second resume glance, here’s what you have to do.

1. Make the top-half of your resume count.

The only part of the resume that everyone reads is your opening profile. This is where you need to distinguish yourself from the 300 other people seeking the same opportunity. In short, you summarize your skills and experience and develop your value proposition. In other words, you are stating, “Here’s what I can do for you, here is how I do it, and here is where I have done it before.” A good test to see if your opening profile is any good is to delete those sentences that all candidates can say and leave only those statements that only you could make.

2. Get in the keywords that matter.

In the 8-second glance, the hiring manager is skimming for relevant keywords and phrases that may inform him you have the right type of experience and skills that match the needs of the job. Things like job titles will automatically apply, but review the job posting carefully for additional hints, like specific technical skills and knowledge-sets like “employee development” or “lean Six Sigma,” and other phrases that may be applied to your resume to make it more eye-catching.

3. Lead with the best information.

Your experience should use the Harvard format: roles and responsibilities in paragraphs and bullets for achievements. This allows them to easily see the bulleted accomplishments. Start your bullets with results and put the most impressive ones first. For example, “Reduced budgeting cycle time 35% by introducing new procedures.” Also, remember to stick with action words, not a passive voice like “helped” or “followed.”

4. Don’t make the reader squint.

When the font size is less than 11, it generally becomes harder to read on screen and on paper. Ensuring your resume is legible in the rush of eight seconds is critical. Stick with traditional fonts like Arial, Tahoma, Cambria, Calibri, or Times New Roman. Also use bold typeface for things like your employer and job title to help guide the reader through the different sections of your resume. Add in the proper amount of white space and use bullet points, and your resume becomes easy to digest – not a document that’s suffocating and chaotic with large blocks of text.

If the hiring manager is not finding the right information in the eight seconds it takes to glance through your resume, it’s going to be rejected.

Related Posts

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Don Goodman

About the author

Don Goodman’s firm was rated as the #1 Resume Writing Service in 2013, 2014, and 2015. Don is a triple-certified, nationally recognized Expert Resume Writer, Career Management Coach and Job Search Strategist who has helped thousands of people secure their next job. Check out his Resume Writing Service. Get a Free Resume Evaluation or call him at 800.909.0109  for more information.


Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here.

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Learn To Love Your Performance Review http://www.careerealism.com/performance-review-love/ http://www.careerealism.com/performance-review-love/#respond Thu, 30 Jul 2015 05:20:43 +0000 http://www.careerealism.com/?p=30712 A performance review can be a valuable exercise for both the employee and the manager if it’s conducted effectively. Here are some tips.

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Performance reviews get a bad rap in many organizations. They are often viewed as labor intensive or just a rote drill that is virtually meaningless to the employee and/or the manager. However, a performance review can be a valuable exercise for both the employee and the manager if it’s conducted effectively.

Related: 5 Tips For Motivating Your Team

If you follow these steps, you’ll love your performance review, because it will be honest and actionable. If you’re the employee:

Talk To Your Manager About What To Expect

Your organization may require you to complete a self-assessment, so make sure you take care of your responsibilities before having the formal review with your manager.

Prepare For The Review

At a minimum, you should brainstorm (and possibly write down) your top accomplishments for the past year (or period of performance being evaluated). This will help your manager justify a salary increase if that’s being considered in conjunction with your review. It’s also a great time to map out your career path and any training or continuing education opportunities you wish to pursue in the near future.

Be Willing To Listen To Constructive Feedback

A performance review is for your benefit, so don’t become defensive if a manager suggests improvement in one or more areas. Listen to what the manager has to say, process the information and then respond appropriately. Your manager’s role is to guide you into becoming a better professional, so try not to take feedback as an assault on your character. If you’re the manager:

Find Dedicated Time To Meet With Your Employee

We all have lots of distractions, so if you can’t spend an uninterrupted hour in the office, consider meeting with your employee in an off-site location. The employee will appreciate your undivided attention and the performance evaluation process will be more meaningful to you both.

Set Expectations

Performance reviews don’t always go hand-in-hand with salary increases, so make sure your employee knows what this performance evaluation means and how the process works. If there’s a concern over poor performance, the employee should be notified of the steps he/she needs to take to improve.

Know It’s Not One And Done

Although the formal performance review may only occur every six months or year, you still need to provide your employees with ongoing feedback. Make an effort to give positive reinforcement for jobs well done, but also deal with performance problems as they arise. The best performance reviews have active participants, positive attitudes, a willingness to listen to each other, mutual goal setting and problem solving, as well as clear performance examples.

This post was originally published at an earlier date.

Related Posts

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Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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Networking Tips For Introverts: Get The Ball Rolling! http://www.careerealism.com/networking-tips-introverts/ http://www.careerealism.com/networking-tips-introverts/#comments Thu, 30 Jul 2015 05:10:40 +0000 http://www.careerealism.com/?p=40153 Introverts are known for avoiding unnecessary interactions. This can make networking hard. Here are some great networking tips for introverts.

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Are you an introvert who is considering career networking (by choice or by force)?

Related: Building Your Network: 5 Tips For Shy Networkers

Introverts are stereotypically defined by their aversion for unnecessary interactions. And some people (not necessarily introverts) think that this hinders in their career path.

Networking Tips For Introverts: Get The Ball Rolling!

Here are some tips to grow your professional network despite your so-called weakness:

Tip 1: Don’t listen to anything with the negative vibe.

Avoid anything that smells negative and feels discouraging to you. Stay away from those who try to feed you with thoughts that reinforce several myths related to introverts. This would stop you from learning necessary networking skills that are needed by a career-person.

Tip 2: Prepare everything that you can get your hands on.

If you are going in events like job fairs, seminars, and conferences related to your profession, do your homework. You can take a look at the kind of companies that are coming, people who are going to give presentations, topics that would be discussed, and so on (this gives you a peg to hang on during your conversations).

Tip 3: Practice beforehand.

You can ask your friend to come over and talk about the event in which you are going to participate. You can try finding some conversation starters. Personal experiences of learning, success, experiments, and so on can be great. Stories always draw attention and strike chord a with the others. You can connect with the people through the stories worth telling.

Tip 4: Employ your listening skills.

People with huge experience always have an audience (and they love to have more). If you are a good listener, you can use this skill to your advantage. Your aim should be to be genuinely interested in a profession and the experience of the seniors in the field. Then, there is nothing stopping you from being a part of a meaningful conversation that can be revived and continued with these people in other events as well (which is what networking is all about).

Work on your networking basics. Everything else would follow!

This is a guest post.

This post was originally published at an earlier date.

Related Posts

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Photo Credit: Shutterstock


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Poll: Do you think it would be useful if recruiters blogged about job search advice? http://www.careerealism.com/poll-recruiters-blogged-job-search/ http://www.careerealism.com/poll-recruiters-blogged-job-search/#respond Wed, 29 Jul 2015 15:24:18 +0000 http://www.careerealism.com/?p=43599 We want to know if you think it would be helpful if recruiters blogged about job search advice! Your answers will help us improve the job search experience!

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Translating Skills For A Career Transition http://www.careerealism.com/translating-skills-career-transition/ http://www.careerealism.com/translating-skills-career-transition/#respond Wed, 29 Jul 2015 05:50:09 +0000 http://www.careerealism.com/?p=43573 Considering changing careers? If you are, you'll need to translate your skills. Try these savvy suggestions for translating skills for a career transition.

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A recent article on a national news site described the transition made by a former NFL player to becoming a ‘gas man’ for a NASCAR Sprint Cup pit crew. The story struck me as interesting from a personal perspective but as I reflected on the article, I saw a powerful message for individuals looking to make a significant career change.

Related: How To Tell Accomplishment Stories Effectively

Many ‘career changers’ struggle with the question of how to translate their experience from a different job or industry. Common questions are:

  • “What jobs am I qualified for?”
  • “How do I describe my “experiences” on my resume?  In an interview?
  • “How do my “skills” translate to a new field?

This story about a NASCAR pit crew member may give ‘career changers’ some insight into how to translate the skills from their experience into powerful information for a resume and for interviews. However, it is not one simple step. It is not just identifying skills. The ‘skills’ need to be presented in the context of specific accomplishments. Let’s look first at the skills identified by the NASCAR pit crew member:

  • “Over-the-wall crews with bigger, faster, stronger and more agile personnel”
  • “It’s a whirlwind, with several tasks being performed in a tight space with traffic and tension all around.”
  • “It’s a high-pressure situation, and you have to be able to think in the moment”
  • “Things can go wrong. You have to be prepared for those to happen…being safe.”

There are some skills and traits here that can be easily identified: faster, agile, several tasks being performed, tension all around, high pressure, think in the moment, things go wrong, prepared, and safe. I can easily identify several positions from entry level in multiple service industries to higher level supervisory, management, and professional positions where those traits and skills would be valued.

Next, let’s look at what a ‘career changer’ needs to do: identify the skills and traits they learned and developed in their experience. This can be a relatively easy step but it also leads to one of the biggest mistakes made by many job seekers. Too often a resume contains laundry lists of skills. In today’s fast-changing, highly demanding world of technology-driven jobs, organizations are not interested in the skills that you have – they want to know what you’ve done with those skills and what you can do with those skills for them.

So the critical action is to describe their significant accomplishments and include in those accomplishments the skills and traits demonstrated!

Skills:

Here’s one ‘skill’ listed on an actual resume, in this case, a veteran wanting to make the major career change from the military to the civilian workforce:

Ability to make rational decisions under extreme duress/stressful situations.

Experiences:

Here’s one of the ‘experiences’ from the same resume:

Responded to emergency calls for support and mitigated crisis situations through pro-active response to anticipated issues.

Accomplishments:

The ‘experience’ is OK as a typically listed job duty – but it is not a strong accomplishment because it does not indicate the result of the ‘responses to emergency calls’.

Let’s put the pieces together. A strong accomplishment identifies the challenge, the action (skills/traits), and the result.

Provided 360 degree coverage for base personnel and assets in the event of a ballistic threat/insurgent attack. Ensured one-hundred percent operability of assigned systems and responded quickly in extremely stressful situations to maintenance issues to ensure continued operability.

As a hiring manager, not only do I see the challenge, the action, and the result of this accomplishment, I am encouraged to know more about it. I am interested in interviewing this candidate to know more about his or her story.

There’s another piece to this puzzle. The critical pieces here, identifying the transferable skills and connecting them directly to accomplishments will fall short if a ‘career changer’ is not applying for jobs where those skills are needed.

Unfortunately, job ads or posts are too often just as weak as candidates’ resumes, listing little more than basic duties. Fortunately, many organizations are starting to create ads and job posts that more realistically portray the challenges of the position – highlighting the work that top performers do.

This will provide better information for searching to match accomplishments with possibilities. I’ll use a basic retail sales position here – something everyone can identify:

Traditional Job Ad/Post:

Help Wanted. Retail Sales Position. The retail organization is seeking highly motivated sales staff for a large electronic retailer. Stores open 7 Days a week – Base compensation plus commission.

OK, that proves I can write a really bad ad. However, it is still fairly typical. Here’s an ad/post that’s better for the organization – and enables a job seeker to get a more accurate picture of a job that might meet their skills and desire.

Performance-Based Ad/Post:

Every day is Black Friday at our Electronics Super Store. There are mobs of people lined up every day to take advantage of our daily deals. Our sales consultants thrive in this chaotic, highly charged environment. They react quickly to ever-changing demands from customers and our inventory staff to manage ‘just arrived’ merchandise. Our top sales consultant thrive in a competitive environment and earn top commissions.

This is simply an example of how a job seeker can examine an ad or job posting to see if it offers the opportunity to use the skills you’ve identified from your experience.

You can explore an organization’s web site for possible connections. You can ask questions about the challenges of the job during an interview. Moreover, you can match the skills you’ve developed in your experience to the demands of many jobs in today’s work environment.

Conclusion

Creating a resume seems natural to many job seekers because all one needs to do is to list skills and job duties. However, that is not going to create a resume or profile that portrays what you do best and how that fits the needs of an organization. Translating those skills and experiences into substantial accomplishments is what leads to more effective interviews and a satisfying career opportunity.

Related Posts

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Jim Schreier

About the author

Jim Schreier is a management consultant with a focus on management, leadership, including performance-based hiring and interviewing skills. Visit his website at www.farcliffs.com.

 


Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here.

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The Importance Of ‘Staying In The Loop’ At Work http://www.careerealism.com/importance-staying-loop-work/ http://www.careerealism.com/importance-staying-loop-work/#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 05:40:44 +0000 http://www.careerealism.com/?p=11056 Information is power. Knowledge is power. You can't effectively succeed if you're out of the information loop at work. Here are some tips.

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Information is power. Knowledge is power. At work, information and knowledge allow us to be at our best and contribute in a highly effective manner. We stay focused on the important, are fully aware of emerging issues and obstacles, and understand the “big picture.” Without timely information and knowledge, we end up working in a vacuum and we’re not hooked in to “real time” needs, opportunities, and circumstances.

Related: How To Build Positive Workplace Relationships

You simply can’t effectively succeed if you’re out of the information loop at work. You’re bound to get tripped up.

Are you in the loop or out of the loop? Some signs you may be out of the loop include:

  • You hear about things only as they are happening, with no advanced notice or no forewarning.
  • You hear about company matters from people and friends outside of your company; you may hear about things first in the media.
  • Others at work often surprise you with things they know about the company.
  • You often find the project you’re working on has been “tabled” or is no longer important – after having spent significant time and effort on the project.

So, what can you do to stay in the loop? How do you keep current on company events, happenings and results? Consider these ideas:

  • Build and maintain your internal network. Do this particularly with individuals outside of your group or department. Expand your “coverage” within the company. Go to lunch, have coffee, attend company outings, and so on.
  • Set up a “Google Alert” using your company name as the search string. You can have those alerts routed to your e-mail box or dropped into Google Reader if you subscribe to that application.
  • Stay in touch with alumni – people who have left the company. You’ll be surprised at how “in the loop” some of those people can be.
  • Maintain a great relationship with your boss/manager/supervisor. Spend time with them often. Ask questions, be alert for signals.
  • Read all information published by your company – newsletters, annual reports, press releases, and so on.
  • Keep your eyes and ears open. Be alert when “outsiders” visit the company, particularly if they spend time interviewing the management team. Ask about those situations.
  • Share knowledge YOU gain with others. You’ll set up a reciprocal type relationship when you do so.

A final note: Beware of the “Rumor Mill.” Always confirm things you hear with others in the organization whom you trust. Don’t be shy about asking your boss or supervisor. Dispel rumors once you know the real story – don’t let them fester.

This post was originally published at an earlier date.

Related Posts

How To Stand Out At Work
How To Overcome Workplace Fears
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Top 3 Character Traits To Look For In Your Next Hire http://www.careerealism.com/next-hire-character-traits/ http://www.careerealism.com/next-hire-character-traits/#respond Wed, 29 Jul 2015 05:30:18 +0000 http://www.careerealism.com/?p=40475 When you're hiring new employees, you need to consider lots of factors. Character is one. Here are three character traits to look for in your next hire.

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When it comes time to search for a new employee, it can be a little daunting to know what exactly to look for. Apart from specialized skills needed for a role, you need to think about what character traits might be the most important, and how do you go about spotting them.

Related: Why You Should Hire For Personality, Not Just Experience

Whether you’re choosing to hire a new recruit yourself or using the services of a recruitment firm like Robert Half, there are three key traits that should definitely be on your “must-have” list.

1. Positive Attitude: Do you want to work with a grouch?

A job candidate’s attitude is a major aspect you want to assess in an interview. Former Southwest Airlines CEO Herb Kelleher is quoted as saying, “We can change skill levels through training, but we can’t change attitude.”

Indeed, the right kind of attitude goes a long way in business and can make the difference between a positive team willing to pull all the stops to make a business the best it can be, and one in which negativity is rife and people can’t wait to leave. Simply ask yourself: Do you know anyone who wants to work with an unhappy, negative team member? Of course not, so keep an eye out for job candidates that have approachable body language, smile and laugh a lot, appear quite relaxed, and generally seem to have a ‘glass is half full’ outlook on life.

Enthusiastic staff members will help to bring a team together, will refuse to get discouraged, and will be more willing to learn on the job and do what it takes to get things done. These types of workers contribute to a positive company culture that benefits not just team members, but also customers, prospective employees, and investors.

2. Initiative: The autonomous worker

The right attitude alone does not, however, guarantee a great hire. You also want to make sure that your candidate has the ability to take initiative. While some employees will do the bare minimum during their work day, and always wait to be told what to do, others will find ways to add value to their employer and their company.

Autonomous workers will be able to get their job done without being micro-managed, and will also find other tasks to complete without needing to be told. People with a “self-monitoring” personality type generally like to work independently and efficiently, and will often be the ones to come up with innovative ideas or ways to save money or increase sales. As an added benefit, self-motivation in employees is a very valuable trait that can also tend to rub off on other staff members. You can determine if a job candidate is likely to be a self-starter, by asking various open-ended questions in interviews so that you can get some insight into their thought processes and patterns of behavior.

3. Flexibility: Prepared for ever changing environments

Last but not least, you have to keep an eye on the flexibility of your candidate. Adaptable team members can bring a lot to a business, especially in small, growing companies where job roles tend to have to expand and change over time as the firm gets bigger and more established.

Flexible staff members will be happy to help out in other roles or departments when needed, and will cope better in constantly-changing business environments or industries. Versatile employees also tend to have a higher level of problem-solving ability, and are more likely to learn new technologies or come up with creative solutions for company problems. To find out if a job candidate has a flexible style, ask them for examples of problems they’ve solved in past roles, new systems or technologies they have learnt or implemented, and skills they’d like to learn in the future.

If you are good at spotting these vital character traits in your candidates, you should not have to fear a bad hire!

This post was originally published at an earlier date.

Related Posts

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Empowered Employees Equals Empowered Company
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Tim Windhof

About the author

Tim Windhof is a published and enthusiastic Resume Writer and Career Coach who is fascinated by helping people take their careers to the next level. Tim is a resume expert and educator for the American Writers and Artists, Inc. and their Resume Writer Training program. Tim has written interview-yielding resumes for clients from the US, Canada, India, Australia, Germany, Austria, and the Netherlands.


Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here.

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Overqualified? So What? http://www.careerealism.com/overqualified-so-what/ http://www.careerealism.com/overqualified-so-what/#comments Wed, 29 Jul 2015 05:20:16 +0000 http://www.careerealism.com/?p=37461 You may have been a slam-dunk for the role, but that is precisely what may have disqualified you. You’re overqualified... but what do you do about it?

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Picture this scenario: you walk into an interview, you nail every question, your chemistry with the interviewer is undeniable, you’re told that they love you and think you’d be a great fit and that you’ll hear from them soon.

Related: 3 Resume Tips To Avoid Appearing Overqualified

You walk out the door, a smile on your face and extra pep in your step. You just nailed it. The job is yours.

It’s not.

In a couple of days you get an e-mail to let you know that they went in a different direction, and you’re confused about what could have possibly went wrong. You have 10 years of experience to the seven being asked for. You have a PhD, have held senior positions, and you’re genuinely excited about this role. Yes, the title isn’t SVP, it’s VP, but the company and the new responsibilities are worth it. They would be lucky to have you!

You’re 100% correct. You may have been a slam-dunk for the role, but that is precisely what may have disqualified you. You’re overqualified, and this new company is afraid to take a chance and bring you onboard because it’s worried you’ll leave the second an opportunity that aligns with your stature becomes available. Or, since you have done this all before you will get bored and make your exit as soon as you hear of role where you can be challenged. You’d be a great fit, but you’re also too great of a risk.  Companies want employees they can count on for the long haul.

How do you handle being “overqualified?” You frame your resume to focus less on titles and years of experience and more on relevant hands-on skills. You let the interviewer know why that specific role appeals to you and how it will help you grow and how your experience will help the company grow. You include a summary at the top of your resume clarifying why you want that specific role and how it fits into your career path. The role in question isn’t a placeholder until you find something better. It is a part of the career you are building. You hit them over the head with information stating “I want this role, I will grow in this role, do not be daunted by my past experience, it is an asset, not a hindrance.”

Being overqualified doesn’t mean all hope is lost. It means you have to tailor your resume and your pitch to your situation and sell yourself to the interviewer. Show you are a crucial piece of their puzzle, and make the case that saying no to you would be a missed opportunity for both parties.  Speak to us and we will discuss a strategy that is right for your job search and career.

This post was originally published at an earlier date.

Related Posts

3 Reasons Why Someone Less Qualified Got The Job
How To Edit Your Overqualified Resume
Overqualified For The Job: What Are Your Options?

 

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