How LinkedIn’s Twitter Integration Has Changed LinkedIn

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By CAREEREALISM-Approved Expert, Joshua Waldman

I used to tell my clients to update their profiles and status on LinkedIn no more than two times a week.

All of that has changed since LinkedIn’s integration with Twitter.

Now, there is almost no limit to the number of times you should update your LinkedIn status, but there are still some things you will need to be careful about.

Update Frequently, but LinkedIn is NOT Twitter

In an earlier post, I wrote about the rules of intimacy for each of the main social media tools. These rules, for the most part, have not changed.

LinkedIn is still a place of professional networking. The voice and tone of what get’s posted in status updates tends to reflect a professionalism typical of LinkedIn’s past.

Twitter on the other hand, in my opinion, is much more casual. I have a celebrity client who told me she tweets about which celeb is having sex with another, because these tweets get more attention.

On Twitter, it’s OK to ask for clicks, retweets and even for business, if done with taste and in moderation.

On LinkedIn, such behavior is not tolerated.

So what has changed?

Simply, the only change is the frequency people are updating their status. Now it seems once or twice a day is quite OK.

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The New LinkedIn/Twitter Strategy

If you are already on Twitter, then making the jump to daily LinkedIn updates is a no-brainer. Most of the Twitter tools, such as Tweetdeck and Hootsuite, already allow you to post to both services simultaneously.

Simply post only the more professional tweets to your LinkedIn profile, leave the rest of them on Twitter.

If you are not on Twitter, then you may still want to adopt the daily status update strategy. It will give you an opportunity to get in front of more people more frequently without breaking any social media Faux Pax.

With more people posting on LinkedIn, there is also more opportunity to interact. Simply leave comments beneath other people’s updates to let them know you are listening to them. This is a great way to begin conversations, network and develop your personal brand.

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CAREEREALISM Badge [Articles]Joshua Waldman is the owner of Career Enlightenment where he helps motivated job seekers get better jobs faster using social media. He received his MBA from Boston University and has 5 years of corporate experience and consulting. You can find him at www.CareerEnlightenment.net or follow him on Twitter at @JoshuaWaldman.

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7 comments

  1. Some people think LI is Twtr. I get 10+ updates from them a day, which is not only annoying but it flushes the normal flow of Update I used to have with current Preference settings. Does anyone know if there is a way to limit (or delete) Updates BY CONNECTION? I am only aware of wholesale ON/OFF control.

  2. Kingsley,

    Yes. The rules of intimacy are SOOOO important. And I'm glad each network is different. Otherwise, where would the innovation come from; where would the value be?

    Certainly there would be little value in a network like LinkedIn if it wasn't so “stuffy”, afterall, I can be more open on Facebook.

    By the way, my cousin's name is Kingsly (spelled a little differently than yours of course).

    -Joshua

  3. Yes, LinkedIn was developed as a networking tool for professionals while Twitter was developed as a tool for any website, individual, or business to share thoughts about any topic. Facebook is along the same lines as Twitter, but I think Twitter is even more casual as not everyone uses their real name like a lot of Facebook users do. I love your rules of intimacy for social media. I have pretty much followed them for Facebook as I simply don't want to make a complete fool out of myself! Potential employers are another great reason to set guidelines for how you use social media.

    • Kingsley,

      Yes. The rules of intimacy are SOOOO important. And I'm glad each network is different. Otherwise, where would the innovation come from; where would the value be?

      Certainly there would be little value in a network like LinkedIn if it wasn't so “stuffy”, afterall, I can be more open on Facebook.

      By the way, my cousin's name is Kingsly (spelled a little differently than yours of course).

      -Joshua

  4. You don't need Tweetdeck or the like to post your Twitter status to LinkedIn. I can post my Twitter updates directly to LinkedIn using LinkedIn itself.

    Personally, I think you should let your personal side show up on LinkedIn as well. If you're a Manchester United Fan or support Michael Schumacher and your tweets reflect this, then I think it's ok for it to go on LinkedIn as well.

    Today, most LinkedIn profiles look staid and boring. Once you let your unique personality shine through, it makes it much more real for a prospective client/employer.

    Cheers
    Mihir Nayak

    • Mihir,

      I totally agree with you on all counts. LI profiles can get boring. And certainly we want to show some personality there to stand out from everyone else. However, I encourage you to consider the possibility that the rules of interaction between the 2 tools are still actually quite different. Where Twitter might encourage abbreviation, non-sequitur and dialogue, LinkedIn is still very much a targeted community with a core mission of “professional networking”.

      • I agree Joshua.

        But in your opinion, wouldn't it be better if LinkedIn became a bit more unbuttoned like Twitter ?

        At the moment, I simply can't get myself to network on LinkedIn because it is so stuffy !

        Cheers
        Mihir

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