OPINION: Employer Stood Up Job Seeker…TWICE!

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Last week, one of the questions that came in for our career experts to answer as part of our Twitter Advice Project involved a job seeker who was stood up by an employer, not once, but TWICE.

Dear Experts,

A successful web development company I have recently applied to stood me up TWO times for a scheduled phone interview. I have spent 2 hours studying their company and their services and an additional 2 hours waiting for them to call me, but the phone never rang. I found their listing through Craigslist.

The first time this happened, they did not even apologize. I wrote them an e-mail 10 minutes after the scheduled interview to make sure they had my correct phone number. They wrote back telling me that the hiring manager had left me a voicemail earlier that day, BUT I did not get any voice messages at all! Then, we rescheduled. However, for our SECOND attempt at a phone interview, which was today, they stood me up again, and I guess the hiring manager called me an hour and a half after the scheduled appointment and finally left a voice message. In the voice message, he apologized for missing the appointment but was unable to offer a reason why.

I find that this unprofessional behavior makes me not want to work for them anymore. However, I also find myself bewildered at what to make of this, the best thing for me to do, and what this unprofessional behavior says about their company. Any thoughts and advice?

If you want to know what the experts advised, CLICK HERE.

More importantly…what would you do?

VOTE HERE:

If you got stood up TWICE by a potential employer, what would you do?

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11 comments

  1. It seems obvious; the recruiters are utterly disorganized (if they wanted to blow you off, they wouldn’t have scheduled the second interview). Also believe me if they are sloppy in this regard, they must be sloppy in other regards as well. And if corporate tolerates that, then maybe you do want to work for them (slackers). Joking aside, the economy being tight means companies must be competitive as well. This is obviously not a competitive company to work for. Be polite and be direct if asked are good advice.

  2. Agree with Lori. Especially in this brutal market, it would be foolish to judge the quality of the company based on how you are being treated by a gatekeeper. Use the power of LinkedIn to perhaps identify who you would be reporting to and send a benign inquiry that you are very interested in exploring opportunities with the firm but are having a few difficulties arranging time with HR on a pre-scheduled phone interview. This might shake things loose for you. If they think enough of you to consider a phone interview, you are already ahead of the pack and in a position to take the next step. Stay at it and good luck!

  3. Agree with Lori. Especially in this brutal market, it would be foolish to judge the quality of the company based on how you are being treated by a gatekeeper. Use the power of LinkedIn to perhaps identify who you would be reporting to and send a benign inquiry that you are very interested in exploring opportunities with the firm but are having a few difficulties arranging time with HR on a pre-scheduled phone interview. This might shake things loose for you. If they think enough of you to consider a phone interview, you are already ahead of the pack and in a position to take the next step. Stay at it and good luck!

  4. Two missed appointments is VERY bad. I agree it is tough to walk away from an opportunity, during these tough times. I would suggest the following; set up a third meeting and in the meantime find people within the company (use LinkedIn). Get their feedback on the company culture. If it still sounds shady, move on, and if need be, cancel (the right way!) your appointment. And if they ask why, be very honest with them. Take the high but tough road. Companies should know why they are unsuccessful at recruiting good people. I would go so far as to say you should send a note to the CEO to let him/her know the reputation their company has in the market. This type of feedback will give them a chance to improve. They may not realize what's going on….

  5. What would you do if you go back and forth with an employer for over 2 months? The process started in late September and is still going on…pretty much, even that I need a job,I am in a mode if I don't get anything definite negative or positive, as of Monday I am ignoring their calls and e-mails. I wish I was stood up rather then having interviews but getting no feedback other then we are still reviewing. In this double stood up situation I am definite of those who wouldn't even look at the employer in an add ever again not along wait for the 3rd interview or accept the job offer, something is seriously wrong on their end regardless of the excuses! We might not have the job, we might even be desperate for work, but one thing is for sure, as professionals one thing we have left in this economy is our dignity and not allow to be treated this way! I sure will not…

  6. I just went through this exact scenario last week. There is no way this can be a good place to work. The lack of respect/follow through/follow up is a precursor for things to come if you stay the course and eventually get hired by this company.

    • I hear you Doug, I struggle with this one too. In a better economy, I'd absolutely advise clients to not bother. And yet, right now, with job seeker to job ratio at 6:1, many folks can't afford not to see each job lead through to the end.

      What's interesting is how successful the firm is. I'd at least want to get inside and see the corporate culture to determine if their success is sustainable. I guess I'd want the right to say 'no' after finally seeing what's going on under the hood.

      Thanks for commenting!

      JT

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